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Courses and Teachers : French
Q:
What do you like about teaching French?
A:

I just love slowly building up my students’ communication potential, spoken but also written — and building up relationships too! I don’t like pressure but I find it very satisfying whenever a student remembers a word, or phrase, or a grammar rule that I’ve taught them. It blows my mind when I can get them to fill conjugation tables by themselves — and better even when they use the verbs correctly when expressing themselves. I like taking students as they come and creating a new way of having class for each of them.


 
Q:
When did you decide to become an French teacher?
A:

I was always good with and interesting in languages. I thought the process was wonderful when I first started learning new languages. The process of gradually being able to say more, to read more and eventually to write stuff by myself. I also like to teach; I like to find the light of comprehension in whoever I am teaching. When teaching languages, each bit of progress gives way new expanses of possibility — and I like the continual enrichment entailed in the learning of a new language. So I had decided to be language teacher before I had even graduated from college!


 
Q:
In your experience, what are the most common reasons for wanting to learn French?
A:

In Montreal, I have taught mostly immigrants who want to interact with their French environment or who need to pass a test for the purpose of residence or employment.


 
Q:
How difficult is it to learn French, compared to other languages?
A:

Difficult. I have taught English extensively, as well as bits of other languages, and I have to say that the number of details involved in speaking (worse, writing) French is particularly intimidating when looked upon as a whole. But I love to build that edifice slowly. And sometimes my students don’t need to be speaking a faultless French!


 
Q:
How is Canadian French different from that of other countries?
A:

It’s actually quite different in its common spoken form, though perhaps less so in central urban areas. When I teach, I make a clear distinction between written/formal/more international French, spoken Quebecois French, and local slang.


 
Q:
What aspects of French Canadian culture are your students usually interested in?
A:

Usually they are interested in everyday situations that are typical of Quebecois life, especially anecdotal examples thereof.


 
Q:
What's the hardest part of teaching French?
A:

The hardest part is not letting my students apprehend the large complex of rules as a dark looming shape that will swallow them. The trick is just taking is easy, going as fast as we can but not pushing it, just putting down a block at a time, taking the time to enjoying whatever we’ve accomplished, and getting where the students needs to be — that’s all. With more advanced students, it is the same: not to try to tackle everything, and have everything perfect all at once, but one step at a time.


 
Q:
What makes a good French student?
A:

Patience does! And, generally, a balance of focus and lightheartedness. And, of course, regular practice/study..!


 

Courses by this teacher:

French: Cours de langue française

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